Recipe for Zoom Prayer and Pretzel Making

I want there to be lots of fun options for connection and community in Lent. I have been brainstorming ideas and wondering what is possible while we are still online.

I want there to be silliness in this season that is usually so somber. We can do that another year. We can revive that tradition when the pandemic is over but let this year have a little festivity. Let it have joy not just on Sundays.

I really want to figure out how to adapt Maren Tirabassi’s caroling idea for Lent but I haven’t figured it out. Caroling requires beloved songs. That’s not exactly something that I associate with Lent but why can’t we have singing? Maybe there could even be dancing? It has to be possible to share in the joy of music. As you’ll see, I took this idea and combined it with pretzel making because why the heck not?

Most often we do the fun things with kids. It’s what we say we are doing to reach kids on their level. We engage them in hands on activities and we add a little something that links it to our shared faith, but grown ups can be tactile learners too, can’t they?

Grown ups need fun too. So I want to suggest that this activity is not just for kids but for anyone interested in adding a few ingredients to their grocery list and rolling up their sleeves to pray with their hands.

Though I tested this recipe with my kids, that is not the only reason I opted not to make this a heavy conversation about prayer. All of these questions and prompts were way above the wonderings of a three year old and a one year old. They did, however, rolling snakes and painting on that egg wash. Oh, there was so much egg wash everywhere.

We also opted to use our sourdough starter with a recipe from King Arthur Baking so I haven’t actually tested this recipe. I just didn’t want to assume that everyone has starter at home. Nor would I assume that that is something everyone wants to start.

I find that I don’t have a ton of room for big thoughts and ideas even as I attempt to share resources and gifts for pastors and ministry leaders like you. As the one year marker of this pandemic sinks in, it seems that many of us just want connection. We want to feel not so alone. We just want to have some fun. This is a recipe for fun for all ages.

Pretzels are a very familiar tradition that go back to the Middle Ages. There is an Italian legend or two. There is another rooted in the German monastic tradition. There are probably several more that seek to explain why the twisting of the arms of these delicious snacks call to mind arms folded in prayer. I confess I got a little overwhelmed in my search for a simple story. If you have a simple story of your own that you’ve shared over the years, I would love it if you would share it. I had never heard before that the three spaces in the pretzel are thought to be spaces for the three parts of the Trinity. I couldn’t help but think about all of the spaces in life right now that would be so wonderfully filled by the Creator, Christ or Spirit One.

Most of the activities I have seen for pretzel making over the years conclude with learning a new prayer which might even include sending a prayer card to all of the participants in the mail after this virtual gathering. Maybe that is how this ends too or maybe it is enough to sing the Doxology as we wait for the holy to fill the gaps in our bodies and souls. I opted not to make mention of this and let you imagine what makes the most sense for your context. I opted to feast together in a shared meal that might feel like communion or a tiny bit of normal gathering with beloved community.

My twist on this familiar activity was not to talk too much about prayer but to actually put prayer into our bodies through movement. The baking time in this particular recipe from Sally’s Baking Addiction is only 10 minutes. That is not long to be silly. I wonder if it’s even enough time for the awkwardness to settle and for joy to release. When I imagined this, I thought I might make a playlist but then I got to thinking about the playlists that Molly Phinney Baskette, author of Real Good Church and Bless this Mess, makes for every Resurrection Day. You can find her 2019 playlist here. I know. It’s not Easter yet but we need joy. Let there be joy. Or you could take requests for joy-filled songs and let that be the playlist that dance sequence. That collection of songs that will surely last more than a mere 10 minutes and it might be a playlist you compile to share with the whole congregation as they take new joys into their bodies.

Have fun this Lent, dear pastors. It’s the encouragement I’m giving myself and I offer it to you too.