Liturgical Lights for Sunday May 24, 2015

J A S M I N E

It’s Pentecost!

For this special day, in which we celebrate the arrival of the Holy Spirit, the Narrative Lectionary has not one — but two readings — including Acts 2:1-4 and Romans 8:18-38.

What a day!

These two passages came together in a sermon I preached back in 2013. It’s this sermon that shapes these prayers. You’ll also find that there’s a slight nod to Memorial Day in the second prayer. It is an observance that I wouldn’t tend to include in the formal liturgy because it’s not a liturgical holiday — but would surely add to the Pastoral Prayer.  Admittedly, the Prayer for the Wind below doesn’t really do a very good job of acknowledging that this Sunday is Memorial Day and not Veterans Day. Just be aware of the distinction as you craft your Pastoral Prayer so that you’re praying for the service men and women who have died — not those who are currently serving.

Call to Worship (Responsive)

Can you hear that sound?
It’s the sound of God’s glory!
Can you feel the wind?
It’s what we’ve hoped to see.
There is something happening in this room.
There is something just about to change.

Prayer for the Wind (A Prayer of Invocation)
Inspired by the Navy Hymn on Memorial Day

Come Holy Spirit!
Be the wind in our sails
for we are breathless with anticipation.
We cannot quite escape the sinking feeling
that all hope is lost.
So, come. Come Holy Spirit!
Turn our breathless, hopeless sighs
into your powerful wind.
Fill this entire space where we are sitting.
Make it so that Pentecost was not something
that happened just once but that happens
again and again when your people feel
your wind pushing us, encouraging us, guiding us
toward the hope we cannot see for ourselves.
Oh, hear us gathered here in this place,
hear us with flames upon our tongues as we cry
out for the gale force of you love.
Blow Holy Spirit!
Blow through the chaos.
Blow through the confusion.
Blow into our weakest parts
so that we are not so tempted to go back
to the way that things used to be
but can truly feel that something has happened.
Something has changed us and we will never be the same.
Come Holy Spirit! Blow through this place!

I would love to hear what you’ve go planned for worship on Sunday. Is there something really wild that you’d like to try? Are you planning something special for this Sunday? I’d love to hear what you’re daydreaming about in the comments below. And, if you happen to use the prayers I’ve written in your worship, and I hope you will, please do offer me credit with as follows:

The prayers in our worship this morning were written by/adapted from Liturgical Lights for Sunday May 24, 2015 by the Rev. Elsa Anders Peters. Elsa is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ who blogs at revelsaanderspeters.com.

Liturgical Lights for Sunday May 17, 2015

J A S M I N EThe Narrative Lectionary on May 17, 2015 is Romans 6:1-14 where it boldly claims, “So you must consider yourself dead to sin and alive in God and Jesus Christ.” My first instinct is to start singing along with Bon Jovi but it really has nothing to do with this text. Except there is something compelling about this idea of Dead or Alive. It would make a good sermon title, I do believe.

Because we’re in this in-between space. Over at Working Preacher, J. R. Daniel Cook points out that in this chapter the verbs referring to Christ are consistently past tense. But the verbs referring to our new life are regularly in the future tense. That is to say that we know about the dead part — but we’re not sure how we’ll come alive. We’re not sure what that resurrection will look like or if it will come. But, the awesome mystery is that we do not have to sin anymore. But, that’s a tricky word. Most might like to avoid it. Perhaps because it’s been overused. Perhaps because it’s hard to define. Or maybe because we’ve used it as a weapon. We’ve charged each other with sin rather than examine our own hearts and minds for sin.

In her little book on this very topic, Barbara Brown Taylor suggests that sin is a “holy, helpful word.” It is in fact “our only hope, the fire alarm that wakes us up to the possibility of true repentance.” It is what points us toward the possibility of becoming alive.

Call to Worship (Responsive)
Inspired by Psalm 51

Dead to the guilt we’ve carried for so many years,
Alive we walk into the newness of life.
Dead to the many things we have done wrong just this week,
Alive we will move for God in Jesus Christ.
Dead to sin that is always before us,
Alive we will be with the grace of God.

Prayer of Invocation 

Come to us, Living God,
As we come together as your people,
With our hearts broken and crushed
Feeling like we are more dead than alive,
Wondering how we might walk into your grace again, Come.
Because we are pretty sure that we can’t do anything right
and that we’ll only make it worse if we even try, so come.
Come to us, Living God,
so that we might feel so alive that we might
be moved to walk or dance or sing
because your grace is so present.
Come, Living God.
Be in every word.
Be in every voice.
Be in every song so that we might come alive again.
Come and walk us into the newness of life.
Help us in all our awkwardness and missteps
to move gracefully into your grace.
May it become so alive in us
in our worship and praise
that we can’t remember when it wasn’t there.
Come to us, Living God, and make us alive again.
In Christ Jesus, Amen.

Call to Confession 

Never feeling like we’ve really found it, always bound by the weights that we carry from our many failures and mistakes, we come before the grace of God to glimpse resurrection. We seek to come alive for God in Jesus Christ by confessing those things that have deadened our hearts and minds. And so we pray together,

Prayer of Confession (Unison)

We don’t like to talk about sin because we don’t really want to admit that we’ve done anything wrong. We don’t want to believe that we’re all that bad. But, Living God, you know. You know that there are things that we’ve done and things we’ve said that have made us feel dead inside. We’ve carried this guilt around for so long that we can’t forgive ourselves. Living God, forgive what we can’t forgive. Or, if that’s not possible, if we can’t believe that even you would forgive us, help us to see these deadening sins as reminders of your grace. Living God, help us to walk into the newness of life in Christ if we could only let go of these sins.

Silent Prayer & Personal Confession

Assurance of God’s Grace (Responsive)

Walk into the newness of life.
Come alive to God in Jesus Christ!
Because God forgives you. God always forgives you.
So we must consider ourselves dead to sin and alive in God and Jesus Christ. Alleluia!

If you use the prayers I’ve written in your worship, and I hope you will, please do offer me credit with as follows:

The prayers in our worship this morning were written by/adapted from Liturgical Lights for Sunday May 17, 2015 by the Rev. Elsa Anders Peters. Elsa is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ who blogs at revelsaanderspeters.com.

Liturgical Lights for Sunday May 10, 2015

J A S M I N EThe Narrative Lectionary on May 10, 2015 is Romans 5:1-11. Of this passage, Karl Barth claims in his great work The Epistle to the Romans:

Love is what endures of our endurance, which is proved in our probation; it is the hope in our hope. By its power, hope is not put to shame; by its power, we glory in hope, glory even in tribulation; by its power we have peace with God; and by it we are what we are not — new [humanity]. ‘After such occurrence, such an encounter, how can we for one moment imagine that the hope of the glory of God putteth us to shame?’

God comes to be what we cannot. That is the hope and it is this hope that does more than justify but moves our worship and praise. So it is this possibility — this concept of hope — that stirs these prayers today. Not a hope soaked in blood or weighed down in suffering but a hope that was born on Christmas, a hope that lived and breathed, that dined with sinners and cried with mourners — a hope that continues to be created over and over again.

Call to Worship (Responsive)

Here is a place to raise our hopes.
Here is a place to boast in what God can do.
Here, we come to find our strength every morning.
God will show us the way
so that we might run and not be tired
so that we might walk and not be weary
so that we might even soar on eagle’s wings.
Here, in this place, God will raise us from death to life.

Affirmation of Hope (Unison)
Inspired by Romans 8:24-25

We were saved in hope.
We are saved by the love God proves for us.
We are saved by the peace God gives to us in Jesus Christ.
This is the hope that saves us
though we can’t see it
and can barely describe it.
For, if we see what we hope for, that isn’t hope.
Who hopes for what they already see?
We hope for what we cannot see
like the child who charts Santa’s route
like the child who never grew up claps wildly when it seems that
Tinkerbell is dying and
like those who have still have a dream.
We wait in patience because we know that God hasn’t given up.
God is always resurrecting hope.
And it is this hope that saves us.
Thanks be to God.

If you use the prayers I’ve written in your worship, and I hope you will, please do offer me credit with as follows:

The prayers in our worship this morning were written by/adapted from Liturgical Lights for Sunday May 10, 2015 by the Rev. Elsa Anders Peters. Elsa is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ who blogs at revelsaanderspeters.com.