What Does This Mean?

Then “there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind.” Other translations describe it as a mighty wind. Or that it was a gale force. Not a calm, peaceful breeze. This wind is powerful. It’s violent so that I can only imagine wanting to call for Auntie Em. Of course, it’s not a tornado but a sound … like a violent wind. When all of the disciples are gathered together, this is what announces the day of Pentecost.

A sound … like a violent wind. There is no word for weather in the Bible, but winds were familiar. A change in the winds called forth the change in seasons. They didn’t understand that change any better than most of us understand it. For most of us, wind is mysterious. Wind is impossible to tame or even predict. But, when it changes, we know that something is about to happen, but what?

We’re just as uncertain as the disciples. We’re just as fearful as they were huddled together in one place trying to figure out what to do next. And then, there’s this sound and a rush of wind that “filled the entire house where they were sitting.” It becomes a presence that fills the whole space. It’s something that everybody feels but no one knows exactly what just happened. It happened and we can see that something has changed but no one seems to know what.

This is the introduction to a sermon that I wrote back in 2009 while I was still pastoring in Maine. Oh, Maine. The next paragraph leads into talking about the stock market and the sudden downturn in the economy that hit that community and so many others hard. So that we could only wonder, Will it get better?  Will it get worse?

Sunday is Pentecost again. It is the day when we find ourselves as uncertain as the disciples again after hearing the rush of a violent wind. It still feels like we are at this moment. It still feels like we don’t know what will happen. We are still asking, Will it get better?  Will it get worse? It’s not the economy that worries us. Or at least, it doesn’t worry us as much as it did then. Things are supposedly better in the economic world. But, not in the political world. As candidates point fingers and galvanize their own support, it becomes clearer and clearer that we don’t really believe in the hope of Pentecost. We don’t believe that we can all come together. It’s not possible to hear the good news in another language. We can only hear it in our own limited view. This isn’t about political parties but “a notion that America belongs to one kind of person.” That is how it was said by Edison Davis in last week’s episode of ABC’s Scandal. Watch the clip of his rant here. That speech almost made me want to edit this sermon to highlight the divisions in our politics and in our church. But, I decided not to do so. I decided instead to center on the question that the disciples ask because it’s the question that I’m asking as the campaign trail narrows to two divisive candidates. Just as the disciples asked when the heard that rush of a violent wind and everyone started talking, I want to know: What does this mean?

What do you think? What does it all mean?

 

Liturgical Lights for Sunday May 24, 2015

J A S M I N E

It’s Pentecost!

For this special day, in which we celebrate the arrival of the Holy Spirit, the Narrative Lectionary has not one — but two readings — including Acts 2:1-4 and Romans 8:18-38.

What a day!

These two passages came together in a sermon I preached back in 2013. It’s this sermon that shapes these prayers. You’ll also find that there’s a slight nod to Memorial Day in the second prayer. It is an observance that I wouldn’t tend to include in the formal liturgy because it’s not a liturgical holiday — but would surely add to the Pastoral Prayer.  Admittedly, the Prayer for the Wind below doesn’t really do a very good job of acknowledging that this Sunday is Memorial Day and not Veterans Day. Just be aware of the distinction as you craft your Pastoral Prayer so that you’re praying for the service men and women who have died — not those who are currently serving.

Call to Worship (Responsive)

Can you hear that sound?
It’s the sound of God’s glory!
Can you feel the wind?
It’s what we’ve hoped to see.
There is something happening in this room.
There is something just about to change.

Prayer for the Wind (A Prayer of Invocation)
Inspired by the Navy Hymn on Memorial Day

Come Holy Spirit!
Be the wind in our sails
for we are breathless with anticipation.
We cannot quite escape the sinking feeling
that all hope is lost.
So, come. Come Holy Spirit!
Turn our breathless, hopeless sighs
into your powerful wind.
Fill this entire space where we are sitting.
Make it so that Pentecost was not something
that happened just once but that happens
again and again when your people feel
your wind pushing us, encouraging us, guiding us
toward the hope we cannot see for ourselves.
Oh, hear us gathered here in this place,
hear us with flames upon our tongues as we cry
out for the gale force of you love.
Blow Holy Spirit!
Blow through the chaos.
Blow through the confusion.
Blow into our weakest parts
so that we are not so tempted to go back
to the way that things used to be
but can truly feel that something has happened.
Something has changed us and we will never be the same.
Come Holy Spirit! Blow through this place!

I would love to hear what you’ve go planned for worship on Sunday. Is there something really wild that you’d like to try? Are you planning something special for this Sunday? I’d love to hear what you’re daydreaming about in the comments below. And, if you happen to use the prayers I’ve written in your worship, and I hope you will, please do offer me credit with as follows:

The prayers in our worship this morning were written by/adapted from Liturgical Lights for Sunday May 24, 2015 by the Rev. Elsa Anders Peters. Elsa is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ who blogs at revelsaanderspeters.com.